Slide transformation Transform your team's practice with Motivational Interviewing Rachel Green dancing gecko
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Motivational Interviewing to change one’s practice.

Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a recognized best-practice therapeutic approach in psychology to help people realize changes in their lives and has been the subject of over 1,000 peer-reviewed articles. It is a collaborative method of communication aimed at strengthening personal motivation for, and commitment to, a specific goal. This is done by eliciting and exploring an individual’s own reasons for change within an atmosphere of acceptance and compassion.

MI is useful with change goals such as choices about tobacco, alcohol or drug use; eating or exercise habits; adjusting your lifestyle after receiving a physical or mental health diagnosis; or just getting “unstuck.”


dancing gecko training offers accredited workshops for all helping professionals.

dancing gecko training comes to your organization (virtually or in person) to offer your team accredited conferences and workshops in Motivational Interviewing in English and in French. This hands-on, dynamic continuing education is ideal for helping professionals at every level, whether you wish to give your team a one-hour taste of MI, or accredited workshops for beginners, intermediates or advanced MI practitioners. Personalized clinical development sessions are also offered.

The founder and lead facilitator of dancing gecko training, Rachel Green, PhD, is a practicing psychologist and university professor who started her career as a neuropsychologist before becoming excited about, and a practitioner of, Motivational Interviewing in 2006. She has led over 350 Motivational Interviewing workshops in Canada, the United States and in Europe. Rachel is a member of the Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers (MINT) and the Association francophone de diffusion de l’Entretien Motivationnel (AFDEM) and is an accredited facilitator by the OTSTCFQ (Order of Social Workers, Family, and Marriage Therapists of Quebec).

Our workshops are ideal for all:

  • Psychologists
  • Psychotherapists
  • Nurses
  • Doctors
  • Social workers
  • Community  workers

  • Teachers
  • Guidance counselors

  • Orientation counselors
  • Addiction workers
  • Nutritionists
  • Occupational therapists
  • Probation officers
  • All other helping professions
  • Psychologists
  • Psychotherapists
  • Nurses
  • Doctors
  • Social workers

  • Community workers

  • Teachers

  • Guidance counselors

  • Orientation counselors

  • Addiction workers

  • Nutritionists

  • Occupational therapists

  • Probation officers

  • All other helping professions

  • Psychologists
  • Psychotherapists
  • Nurses
  • Doctors
  • Social workers

  • Community workers

  • Teachers

  • Guidance counselors

  • Orientation counselors

  • Addiction workers

  • Nutritionists

  • Occupational therapists

  • Probation officers

  • All other helping professions

In our workshops, participants learn and practice MI skills in a respectful, safe environment where their previous knowledge and experience is valued. All workshops and clinical development sessions are, or can be, recognized by the Order of Psychologists of Quebec for continuing education credits except where otherwise noted.

Discover our workshops

Why dancing gecko training is different from other programs:

Very well organized. Very dynamic. I have 25 years of service and this is definitely the training that has been the most useful and helpful to me on a personal and professional level. Thank you very much!

Nadia Beaudoin

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